How to Create an Awesome Indie Game Trailer

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By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

Trailers play a really important role in helping you to market your game to the world. They can be a great way to engage with people and to get them excited about playing your game. However, it’s not always obvious where to start or how to put one together so that it really showcases your game!

So, I’m Ninichi, a game music composer (check my game music stuff out!) and I’ve been involved in creating the music for various indie game trailers and game music soundtracks.. Through the work I’ve done with various super talented indie game developers, I’ve come to understand and appreciate just how challenging it is to put everything together. That’s why I’ve created this blog – to offer some tips, ideas and hopefully useful bits of information to support your game development. So, let’s take a look at a few ideas and steps to explore, which I hope will help you to create your awesome game trailer:

1. Create a powerful intro

The beginning of your trailer is super important since in those initial moments you have the opportunity to really capture someone’s attention. You’ll have around 5 seconds max to get them hooked into watching the rest of the trailer so think carefully about what you want to show them in those first few moments.

2. Focus on the gameplay

People will be watching your trailer because they want to know what your game is about and what it looks and feels like. So, besides from your intro and the call to action, the main focus of your trailer should be all about the gameplay. 

Include different clips and sections of your game and perhaps highlight any special features that you have in your game that set it apart from others. Build up a story perhaps and offer viewers a glimpse of what amazing things you’ve done so far and also try to create a sense of wonder of what’s to come also. 

Take your time in playing around with your game and choosing what to display. Try to find the most engaging and appealing gameplay situations that are possible so that people can really experience the best of what there is. 

3. Get great music and sound effects

The music and sound in your game trailer is the key to setting the right tone for your game. Music captures and drives the emotions within a game and is what sets the pace of it. So, it’s important to think carefully about what kind of music will help to get viewers excited about your game.

Choose music that reflects the rhythm of your game and that will help to maintain your audience’s attention and interest through your trailer. Work with a composer to create custom music for your game trailer and to ensure that it’s the very best that it can be. (Drop me a line if you’d like my help with this!)

The audio and visual components to your trailer are of equal importance and must work in tandem together. There’s no point in having great visuals alongside uninspiring music or the other way around, as that will just diminish the whole experience.  Remember that your trailer is there to sell your game and to build excitement around it. So, make sure that every aspect of your trailer – music, visuals, sound etc. all help to achieve this.

4. Keep it short

For game trailers less is more. Keep it short and snappy! People don’t have time to watch a really long trailer and also long trailers don’t tend to keep people’s attention. A great game trailer is usually less than 2 minutes long, which is similar to what people tend to get and expect from movie trailers. Aim for 60-90 seconds if you can as that should be enough time for you to get your message across, show some key aspects of the game mechanics and gameplay, reel people in and to work that call to action!

5. Build credibility around the game

Include reviews or short quotes from industry professionals if you have any, to help build a sense of credibility and authority around your game. This could be positive comments from another game developer, a game journalist, blogger, magazine or industry veteran perhaps.  It will add a bit of weight to your project and help others to take it more seriously.

Also include clear branding for your indie game studio, if you have one, so that people know who you are and to offer a sense of polish and professionalism. Include it at the beginning and the end of the video. 

6. Have a clear call to action

At the end of your trailer, always include a very clear call to action. Tell people what you want them to do after they’ve watched your trailer e.g. to visit your website, or buy your game (from Apple/Google store or Steam or wherever), or sign up to your newsletter etc. Pick one call to action and make it easy for viewers to do.


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About the author: Ninichi is a freelance composer for indie games, films and media. She’s a great supporter of indie games and has created the music for numerous indie game trailers and game music soundtracks. To listen to some of her music see Ninichi’s game music.

Also follow her @ninichimusic & contact her to commission her for your project.

Introducing Ninichi’s Fantasy Atmospheres 1 (Royalty Free Ambient Music)

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By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

Have you been searching for atmospheric, mood creating music for your video game, film or videos? If so, Fantasy Atmospheres 1, could be just what you need! 

I’m Ninichi, and I’m a freelance composer! What that means is that I create music for games, films and other media (see my homepage). I’m usually commissioned to create custom music for different projects, however, I’ve also made some of my music available to license here on my website.

Fantasy Atmospheres 1 – offers a unique set of 4 beautiful scene setting tracks designed to create a sense of calm and magic for your projects. Each track has it’s own distinct melody yet all 4 tracks blend easily together to form the perfect soundtrack for any project.

If you’re looking for a way to create some added depth and ambience to your project, check out Fantasy Atmospheres 1 music pack now.

Here’s a quick sneak preview of two of the tracks available in Fantasy Atmosphere’s 1…

All the tracks are ‘ready-to-go’ and can be looped seamlessly. You’ll get mp3 files that are easy to download and use straight away. There’s also a bonus track included in case you need that little bit more music for your project! 

If that’s not enough though, don’t fret – there’s Fantasy Atmospheres 2 available now also. 


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About the author: Ninichi is a freelance game music composer and film music composer. She creates music for indie gamesfilms, podcasts, tv shows, commercials and more. 

She is an incredibly diverse composer with an extensive credit list to her name. If you'd like help with music for any project, feel free to contact her now.

Follow her @ninichimusic

How to Create An Effective Podcast Intro or Jingle

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By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

Do you want people to enjoy & look forward to your podcast? Do you want more subscribers and for each one to tell others about it? If so, paying close attention to your podcast intro and outro is a must do. How you start your podcast and how you end each episode can really affect how people feel about you and your podcast and so it’s important to get it right.  If it’s not memorable and doesn’t excite your listeners in the right way, it could actually be turning them away from you.

I’m a jingles composer and have created intros, outros and theme tunes for various podcasts, web series, commercials and more (see my jingles & intros page). Those who come to me understand the impact that a good podcast intro and outro can have. Here I will try to share a few tips and ideas that may help you to think through what kind of podcast intro or jingle you may want and how to make it effective for you…

1. Know what your podcast intro is for

This may sound obvious but I feel that it’s always a good place to start. What is the purpose of your particular podcast intro? What do you want it to do for you?

Is it there to excite people before you start talking? Is it there to represent your brand and personality? Is it there to give people a flavour of what you’re about?

2. Keep it short, simple and sweet

Most podcast intros and outros I’ve worked on have tended to be between 30 seconds to 60 seconds long. Some are shorter, snappier 15 second intros and others are much longer theme tunes e.g. up to 3 minutes for bigger shows, however, 30-60 seconds seems to be the norm. Think about how long you want your intro to be. 

By keeping it fairly short and having a simple tune, it can be easier to make it catchy and memorable without boring or overwhelming the listener. You don’t want it to feel long or repetitive or confusing and one of it’s main purposes will most likely be to capture people’s attention before you get into your content, so keep this in mind when thinking about what kind of opening and approach you want to go for.

3. Go for something positive and uplifting

In most cases, going for something with a happy and uplifting feel is a good approach as it installs positive feelings towards you, your podcast and brand. It helps to put people in a good mood and thus can help people to look forward to listening to your show.

There are, however, some cases where you may want a different feel – for example if you’re podcast is about horror movies or something else that might have a dark, mysterious or other kind of mood. In those cases, you may want to consider having a jingle that reflects what your podcast is about, but otherwise positivity is best!

4. Be consistent & Know what info to share when

This is a more general tip about how you may want to format and organise your podcast. Firstly decide whether or not you want your podcast intro music to stand-alone and then be followed by content, or if it’s there as background music, which you will then talk over. Neither option is necessarily better than the other but it does go back to our first point, which is to know what the exact purpose of your intro is.

You can certainly experiment, and allow yourself lots of creative freedom in how you present information in your show. However, from my experience there will tend to be some bits of information that you will want to share on each episode.   By establishing a fixed format for these elements, you can build professionalism and consistency into your show. So, some of these things may include:

  • Intro Music

  • Podcast Name

  • Host Name(s)

  • Episode Title &/or Number

  • Saying who your podcast is for

  • Sharing what the show is about or summarising what’s to come in the episode

  • Main Content

  • Sponsors

  • Outro Music

Ok, so there are my 4 tips to hopefully help you with your podcast intro or show intro. If you’d like some help with your intro music feel free to contact me to explore getting a custom intro or outro for your show. Or, check out my royalty free podcast intros available to license from my site now.  


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About the Author:

Ninichi is a freelance jingles composer, game music composer and film music composer. She has created theme tunes, intros and outros for various adverts, podcasts and shows, as well as composing original soundtracks to different indie games and films. Learn more about Ninichi here.

If you need help with music, contact her now to discuss your project and music needs.

11 Awesome Places for Game Developers to Learn Unity & Programming

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By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

If you’re hoping to develop your own game, you may be thinking about which game engine to use and if you’ve chosen which one, you’re probably wondering where to start!

Unity is one of the most popular game engines around and as a game music composer (see more about me and my musicif you wish!) I’ve worked with many super talented indie game developers who I know would swear by it! I must confess, I’m not a programmer and so I can’t give you first hand advice or suggestions on how to go about creating your exciting game, but I have supported enough indie game developers to know that the road ahead may be quite a challenging one!

So, given the popularity of Unity, I thought that it could be useful to help compile some awesome places online where you can learn how to use it and how to get the best out of it.  

We all learn in different ways and you may know of or come across other resources that could suit you better, but I hope that these offer a starting point to your (hopefully wonderful), game development journey!

1. Unity Tutorials

https://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials

If you’re looking to learn Unity, it makes sense to take notice of some of the tutorials provided by Unity themselves! Check out their website for a variety of tutorials covering everything from creating 2D platformers, 3D games, survival shooters and more. Their tutorials are designed to support people just starting out through to more advanced game developers. 

2. Udemy

http://udemy.com

Udemy is an online course website and catalogue with over 80,000 courses to choose from with new courses becoming available each month. Some courses are fairly cheap and there are regular sales – so keep a look out for those. A good one to start with for learning Unity and getting started in game development is: https://www.udemy.com/unitycourse

Also check out Gamedev.tv, created by Ben Tristem, a Udemy instructor focusing on helping anyone wanting to learn about development, design and selling indie games. There you can see which courses he and his team created on Udemy and also access their gamedev community and blog for further support.

3. Brackeys Game Dev Tutorials

https://youtu.be/j48LtUkZRjU

This is an awesome YouTube channel dedicated to learning how to make video games. New videos are uploaded each Sunday with Brackeys explaining his code as he writes it, and there’s a wealth of information and video tutorials on everything from Unity, programming through to game design and more.

4. Walker Boys Studio – Unity Training Series

http://www.walkerboystudio.com/wbstudio/learn-unity

This company, set up by 3 game developers offers a range of free courses covering game art, Unity, drawing and game development. The Unity Training Series is a step-by-step guide with over 50 hours of video, to learning Unity.

5. 3D Buzz

https://www.3dbuzz.com

This site offers an extensive video training library covering programming, game development, 3D design and animation, mobile app development and more. The training tools on this site aren’t free but are reasonably priced and cover a lot of ground. There’s also a community and blog for added support.

6. Gamedev Academy

https://gamedevacademy.org

The Gamedev Academy is part of Zenva Academy, which offers a host of courses and online learning. On the Gamedev Academy website you’ll find a range of free ebooks and courses to explore. Check out these: https://gamedevacademy.org/category/tutorials/unity

7. Unity Student

http://www.unity3dstudent.com

Unity 3D Student offers ‘bitesize’ modules alongside various challenges to help you learn the skills required to develop a game using the Unity Game Engine. The modules are short explanation/tutorials offering some insight into the game mechanics, which you watch and learn from, and the challenges give you tasks to get you actively learning and using your newly learned skills! Unity3DStudent is the brainchild of Will Goldstone who’s main aim is to provide new developers with a modular way of learning.

8. Catlike Coding 

https://catlikecoding.com/unity/tutorials

Jasper Flick, the man behind Catlike Coding is a Dutch independent softward developer. He’s written loads of tutorials, which you can find on his site designed to help you learn and make the most of Unity.  The tutorials on his site are all free but you can donate to him via Patreon if you want to.

9. Hackr.io

https://hackr.io/tutorials/learn-unity

Hackr.io offers a range programming courses and tutorials all in one place – from a basic introduction to programming, through to android development, Unity, artificial intelligence, blockchain programming, assembly language courses and more. 

10. Game Code School

http://gamecodeschool.com

This site has lots of lessons and courses to help the beginner through to intermediate game programmer. You can learn the different engines including Unity, Unreal, Game Maker and more. You won’t be able to download all the sample projects but you should have access to the final code, tutorials and written explanations to help you with your learning.

11. Envato Tuts+

https://gamedevelopment.tutsplus.com/tutorials/search/unity

Envato Tuts+ is part of the Envato empire and offers easy learning courses online. If you search for tutorials covering Unity or any other parts of game development, you will certainly find some interesting and useful courses to look out and learn from.

So, I hope that these 11 wonderful sites give you something interesting to check out! Happy learning and if you need any help with music and your game music soundtrack, do drop me a line!


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About the author: Ninichi is a game and film music composer. She works on a range of freelance composing projects supporting talented game developers and film makers with their music. 

Want some great custom music for your game? Listen to Ninichi's game music or contact her now to discuss your game music needs.

Follow her @ninichimusic

Introducing the Documentary about Gaming & Mental Health: Game Flow

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Interview By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

I’m really excited to be introducing you to Game Flow in this blog! It’s a really interesting film about gaming and mental health which I had the honour to learn about & get involved in after discovering they were in need of a composer. I connected with Emily Crawford, the Director, Producer and Editor for the documentary and together we worked on the music for the film.

The soundtrack to the film has been completed and I’m super excited to see how the film evolves and how people react to it! Check out the trailer for Game Flow:

Now, let’s check out this wonderful interview with Emily to learn a bit more about this documentary and why this topic of gaming and mental health is so important…

Who are you and how long have you been involved in films? 

‘I'm a documentary filmmaker, researcher, and writer based in Washington, DC. I've been working in film/television in some capacity for the past 7 years or so, but I only recently started producing and directing my own films. This will really be the first film on this scale that I've produced and directed myself.’

What’s Game Flow about and where did the inspiration behind this documentary come from?

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Game Flow is a short documentary about how gaming can be a powerful tool to help people deal with anxiety and mood disorders. It celebrates the positive impact that games can have on mental health, and attempts to debunk misconceptions about video games being addictive or encouraging violence. 

The inspiration for the film came from my own experience – several years ago, I was struggling with some mental health issues myself, and had also recently started playing a lot of video games for the first time as an adult. I noticed that games were helping me process my emotions in helpful ways, so I started researching the subject. I soon found that there was a lot out there to support what I was experiencing, not only anecdotal evidence but also studies that have been done, things like that. So I decided to make a documentary about gaming for mental health as my MFA capstone project for grad school, and that became Game Flow.’ 

Why do you feel this topic is important? What are you hoping people will takeaway or learn from this film?

‘I feel that this topic is important because outside of the gaming community, nobody really talks about the positive aspects of gaming. There is so much media attention given to the supposed downsides of games, like increased violence or addiction. But there's really very little solid research to support the idea that video games are addictive, or that violent games encourage aggression. There are interviews with psychologists and games researchers in the documentary that get into all of this. 

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Meanwhile, mental healthcare is really inadequate in most of the world, and mental illness still heavily stigmatized. Games are this potential tool for good that is largely being ignored. I'm not advocating for gaming to take the place of therapy or psychiatric care, of course, but games can be a really helpful supplement to treatment.

There is research being done on the subject, and there are some wonderful people incorporating gaming into mental healthcare, but no one really knows about it outside of some very small communities. So I wanted to bring attention the subject, to destigmatize mental illness and gaming, and to encourage people to explore the therapeutic potential of games, especially for mood and anxiety disorders. 

I hope that the film will change at least a few minds about games, and video games especially – because the documentary is about games in general, including board games, cell phone games, etc. But I focused especially on video games in part because they're the most heavily stigmatized. There are still a lot of people out there who think that gamers are all antisocial teenage boys or men who live in their parents' basements. I want to show those people that not only can games be this powerful art form and force for good, but that the people who play them are really diverse and often brilliant, inspiring people who are successful in endeavors outside of gaming.’

Who’s been involved in the film and what has the process of making it been like?

‘I've had a wonderful, generous team of crew members, faculty advisors, funders, and other collaborators, and I could never have finished production without them. The crew were mostly my classmates from film school, as well as my very patient boyfriend, Joey Trimboli, who has also helped with marketing and outreach. Filming was a great experience because it involved meeting all of the amazing people who are in the film. I was able to connect with people over our shared experiences with games and mental health, and I made several real friends along the way. 

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The postproduction process has been a little tougher, mostly because I'm busier with other things theses days – I've been working on other documentaries in order to gain professional experience (and pay the bills), and so have been squeezing my work on Game Flow into my evenings and weekends. But finishing the rough cut felt really good, and I was able to graduate and receive my MFA degree based on that, and have gotten some great feedback on it so far. It's been rewarding to see all of the final pieces start falling into place – now that the soundtrack is done, all that's left to do is a final audio mix, color correction, and finalizing the graphics.’ 

What was your thinking behind the music soundtrack? What made you decide to work with me (Ninichi) & what has it been like?

‘I had gotten this idea stuck in my head that I wanted to do something influenced by chiptunes and retro game music in general. I think I wanted to evoke nostalgia for the games people played when they were young, because that's when most people first connect with the medium.

I posted on social media (@GameFlowDoc) that I was looking for a composer for the film. I heard from quite a few people, but Ninichi's portfolio really stood out, both because of her talent in general, and her obvious familiarity and skill with chiptunes and game music. Most of the composers who expressed interest in the project had done music for games, which I thought was really cool, but Ninichi was unique in that she had already done things very similar to what I wanted for the film. 

Working with Ninichi was amazing! I had never had the opportunity to work directly with a composer before on one of my own films, so that was exciting in itself. Ninichi made the process really easy, and was very receptive to my input and feedback. I really think that the music she composed makes the film more powerful. It's also totally stuck in my head all the time now!’

What are your plans for the film, where can we watch it and what’s next for you?

‘As soon as the postproduction for the film is finished (which will be in Spring 2019), I'll be submitting it to festivals and doing some community screenings in the Washington, DC area. After a festival run, we'll make the film free to watch on Youtube and on our website, gameflowdocumentary.com. We'll be posting updates on the website regularly about screenings, festivals, and our progress in general, so anyone interested in the film should definitely keep an eye on the site. You can also sign up to receive updates about our festivals, our release date, etc. 

I'm not sure what my next project will be yet, but I do know that Game Flow will be an ongoing effort even once the film is released and the festival run is done – I want to build out the website more, and make it a sort of living database of resources related to games and mental health.’ 

This all sounds fantastic! Thank you so much for taking the time to tell us about Game Flow. We will be sure to keep our eyes out for the documentary and to spread the word where we can!

See other films Ninichi’s been involved in:

Articles for filmmakers:


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About the interviewer: Ninichi is a freelance composer who creates music for indie games, films and media. She is a great supporter of indie projects and runs this blog in the hope that it offers useful insights for the game development community.

She is open for commissions and would be happy to help you with the music to your game should you need it. Contact her now to discuss your project with her.

Game Development Tips from the Creator of Brass Bellow

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By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

Are you an indie game developer working on your first game or perhaps you’re part of a games studio and you’ve created several games already!? Either way, a very warm welcome to my blog!

I’m Ninichi and I’m a freelance game music composer. I make music for indie games, films, TV shows and anything else that needs music really! I also have this blog on my website, which offers a place for people to learn, get inspired, share experiences, get tips and hopefully much much more.

Recently I’ve been sharing my interviews with various talented indie game developers who have been kind enough to share some of their top tips and experiences with us. This time we have the creator of Brass Bellow, an indie game currently in development right now by @128_mhz

Please tell us a bit about who you are and what you’ve been up to with your game development!

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‘I'm, @128_mhz on twitter. I've been doing game development for coming up on 5 years now. The game I'm working on currently is Brass Bellow.

Brass Bellow is an open world seafaring adventure exploration game. You will find yourself exploring lush abandoned environments, and talking to fantastically strange creatures along your journey. I'm trying to take a deep dive towards making a world that feels like it has a pulse of it's own.’

Wow Brass Bellow sounds amazing and like a game definitely worth keeping an eye out for! What top tips can you share with us around how to build a following for your games and be successful as a full time game developer? 

1. Emotions: I focus on making things that provoke a emotional response in myself.

2. Being open to improvement: I'm always honest with myself about where I could improve my work in order to bring it closer towards the vision I have of the game. If it doesn't look like what is is my mind I keep reworking it until it does.

3. Not forcing yourself: When the creativity stops flowing I take a break, and do something else until I have some more energy to work again. It's not worth forcing yourself to work overtime, and compromise the quality of the game just to feel like you're not idle.

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4. Staying positive: I try to get excited about what I'm making constantly. When I am in a more positive mindset, I find that I get a lot of useful ideas that wouldn't have otherwise popped into my mind.

5. Pacing yourself: Working on a large game is not a sprint it's a marathon. There is no glory in working yourself into the ground in 6 months, and never wanting to touch a line of code again. Pace yourself, setting healthy routines will take you a long way. Only you know what work schedule is best for you. It doesn't matter what everyone else is doing, you do what is best for you, and don't feel guilty if it's not the same as everyone else.

6. Questioning: I ask myself a lot of questions of about what I really want the game to be about. I find the final vision of the game in my mind, and work through it, fleshing it out, taking the time to visualize all the details. Going through this regularly gives me a accurate direction to work towards everyday, and solid goals to achieve.

Do you have any tips you can offer around using Unity that may help other fellow developers?

‘When I work with unity, I get in the habit of making small simple behavior scripts very reusable. I like stuff like being able to drop a script on a gameobject, and have it be a fully functioning container the player can loot.’

Do you have any final words of wisdom you’d like to share?

‘Game development is a winding road, and just because you're stuck in the woods today doesn't mean things won't be completely different in two weeks. Keep your head up, and work towards making something you love!’

Awesome! Thanks so much for sharing your tips with us. To see more top tips from talented game developers see:


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About the interviewer: Ninichi is an indie game music composer who enjoys creating soundtracks for video games, film & media. She composes in a wide range of styles & loves supporting indie game developers and indie filmmakers with their projects. Find out more about her game music or royalty free music and contact her to discuss your project and music needs.

Follow her @ninichimusic

Introducing the Web Series: Questionable Qloset by Dr Crafty

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Interview By Ninichi | Contact | Follow

Hello and welcome to the Ninichi blog! If you’re looking for something fun to watch on YouTube, check out Questionable Qloset! I came across Dr Crafty sometime last year and was delighted to learn more about this new show and to work on the intro theme tune for it. As a freelance composer I get the pleasure of working with many talented professionals in games, film & other media and this show is a great one to get to know and take a look at!

It’s a wonderful magical world where your questions get answered, so find out more about this show and who’s behind it now…

Who are you & can you please introduce your channel to us?

‘I'm Alexander Tansley aka Dr Crafty, and I host the Dr Crafty Youtube show, and it's spin offs; the CharaCafe, Top 10 tub, and the the recently debuted Questionable Qloset. My channel came about from watching speed art videos of other artists, when I found myself having difficulty maintaining attention to them, which lead to ask how I would take this basic formula and make it entertaining. So, after some tinkering and doodling, I came up with the idea of making a more establish frame work with character hosts, to make engaging commentary and comedic banter. And thus we have the Dr crafty show as you see it now!‘

What is Questionable Qloset about & how did you come up with the idea?

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‘The newest show on our channel. The Questionable Qloset, came about after I was growing tired of Q and A sites like Curious Cat and Ask FM, but still wanted that interaction with my fans in a meaningful way. So I thought why not make a show all about answering questions from my fans in a interestingly themed way. So that when I started coming up with the fortune teller idea, and just kept adding more to the aesthetic like the tarot cards themed around the rest of the Crafty Crew. Now my patrons can ask questions about anything on the show, and maybe see it answered in a more entertaining and interactive fashion!’

Who's been involved in the series and what are your plans for it?

‘The team behind my show has been steadily growing as more shows are made and the channel becoming bigger. You have the voice actors; Megami33 of Team 4 star fame, Toxicsoul77 and Katy Johnson (who are also the show's writers, our editing teams consisting of the fine fellows at http://toongrin.com  and RJGrid, and we've been expanding the team to include artists who design special merchandise items for us over at Teepublic we're always planning out new show concepts, and with patreon support, we'll be making those new ideas a reality eventually.’

Where's the theme tune & intro come from? What is that meant to convey?

‘The intro theme for Questionable Qloset (created by Ninichi) was largely inspired by the Poirot TV series opening theme, which helped add that feeling of mystery and intrigue to show, befitting the show host; Crystelle's mysterious and alluring character.

The reason I felt Ninichi would best fit this new series, is unlike the last 3 shows which all have a more lighthearted goofy tone to them, this show needed something more classical to create a stronger contrast between Crystelle's show and the rest of the casts. So Ninichi's intstrumentations really help this show stand out from the rest on the channel.’

What can we expect from Questionable Closet & why should we listen to it?

‘Questionable closet is a fun way to find out any fun or strange secrets that otherwise might not be explored on the main shows themselves, and the questions are always answered in a more entertaining way than simply getting a notifaction about it in text form. Crystelle adds more personality to the response we give those who ask us their questions.

So if you're a fan of the main show, and wanna know some silly secrets about the cast, this is the show to go to. You can find all of our shows at the Dr Crafty channel https://www.youtube.com/drcrafty, and eventually our own official website currently in development!’

How fun! Thanks for telling us more about Questionable Qloset. We will make sure to check it out!


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About the interviewer: Ninichi is an indie game music composer who enjoys creating soundtracks for video games, film & media. She composes in a wide range of styles & loves supporting indie game developers and indie filmmakers with their projects. Find out more about her game music or royalty free music and contact her to discuss your project and music needs.

Follow her @ninichimusic